U of A biologists determine when and where disease transmission between elk and cattle is most likely, develop guidelines to help ranchers prevent it.

10
February
2020

Diseases transmitted from wildlife are a common threat to livestock and humans in Alberta, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. 

“One of the biggest risks to the livestock industry is the transmission of disease from wildlife to livestock,” said Mark Boyce, an ecologist in the Department of Biological Sciences. 

Boyce said the long list of diseases that occur between livestock and wildlife includes anthrax, bovine tuberculosis, brucellosis, and many species of worms such as tapeworm and roundworm. 

“And in addition to infecting one another, many of the diseases that are shared by wildlife and livestock are zoonotic, meaning that they also can infect humans,” he noted.

Boyce said the foothills in the southwestern part of the province are home to wild elk as well as cattle on ranchlands—and when the ...

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07
February
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Trust in science a complicated matter, says Christian professor

Rising skepticism can signal competing values.

It took Denis Lamoureux 13 years and four graduate degrees to accept his first biology
06
February
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Simple tool assesses physical and social frailty, predicts outcomes for vulnerable patients

University of Alberta assessment used worldwide to improve health care for seniors.

A simple tool developed more than 20 years ago at the University of Alberta is proving useful
06
February
2020
| 13:55 America/Tegucigalpa

Why weight training may be the best exercise for everyone

From avoiding lower back pain to burning more calories and improving memory, weightlifting offers wide-ranging benefits for body and mind, say U of A experts.

While research shows little or no link between exercise and any meaningful long-term weight loss,
05
February
2020
| 22:25 America/Tegucigalpa

‘Shakespeare’s Dog’ puts spotlight on our deep connection with canines

U of A production of play about the Bard’s best friend takes audience engagement to new level with service and rescue dogs in theatre lobby.

Almost nothing is known about Shakespeare’s “lost years,” the seven-year period before he arrived